MRIMS Journal of Health Sciences

CASE REPORT
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 77--80

Lessons from a battle-front: When and where to “scoop and scoot”?


Shibu Sasidharan1, BL Lahareesh1, Harpreet Singh Dhillon2 
1 Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Level III IFH Hospital, MONUSCO, Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo
2 Department of Psychiatry, Level III IFH Hospital, MONUSCO, Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shibu Sasidharan
Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Level III IFH Hospital, Goma
Democratic Republic of the Congo

There has been game-changing advances in battlefield medicine. Improved training and expertise has enabled emergency medical personnel to provide advanced levels of care at the scene of trauma. It is better to “scoop and run” than “stay and play”. Current data relates to the urban environment where transport times to trauma centres are short and where it appears better to simply rapidly transport the patient to hospital than attempt major interventions at the scene. There may be more need for advanced techniques in the rural environment or where transport times are prolonged and certainly a need for more studies into subsets of patients who may benefit from interventions in the field. This report examines how time and early response is crucial in saving lives and decreasing morbidity. This article also gives insight into the to-do list for paramedics and doctors before and during causality transfers.


How to cite this article:
Sasidharan S, Lahareesh B L, Dhillon HS. Lessons from a battle-front: When and where to “scoop and scoot”?.MRIMS J Health Sci 2021;9:77-80


How to cite this URL:
Sasidharan S, Lahareesh B L, Dhillon HS. Lessons from a battle-front: When and where to “scoop and scoot”?. MRIMS J Health Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Oct 21 ];9:77-80
Available from: http://www.mrimsjournal.com/article.asp?issn=2321-7006;year=2021;volume=9;issue=2;spage=77;epage=80;aulast=Sasidharan;type=0